How to help prospects self-qualify early on

By Renae Gregoire | Customer experience

Jan 18
How to find people interested in your product or service

How do you help prospects self-qualify when they click through on a link of yours? 

Maybe it's a link on your website, a link in a blog post, or a link in a social share. Maybe the link takes a prospect to a special landing page, a form, a download, or a static page on your site.

Ask yourself: Who is that prospect? Why is she there? Why did he click? What did she hope to find?​

Answering those questions is crucial if you want to avoid a common content mistake: Presenting major self-qualifying information too late, leaving the reader feeling annoyed and let down because she wasted her time.​

An example: How a company led me on a dead-end journey​

If you know anything about me, then you know I'm writing this post because I am that "she"; I just experienced this frustration myself, and am sharing it with you so you can spare your website visitors and content readers the same frustration.

Here's the story.​

As a freelancer, I'm always on the lookout for new opportunities. I apply for online gigs all the time so I can keep my pipeline full and my cash flow ... flowing.

One ad in particular, for a company looking for a freelance writer, sounded as if it might be a good fit. So I clicked the link, which took me to the job description on the company's website.

It was a pretty long description, taking me six full scrolls to get to the end.​

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Scroll.​

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​Now mentally multiply that distance by three to get an idea of how long the job description was.

And then, consider this: I eagerly read all of the text presented during those scrolls, getting more and more excited about the gig as I went.​

Until finally, I reached the end of the post to find this CRUCIAL, decision-turning information, highlighted in yellow.

"Well," I thought, frustrated. "That means I'm out of the running." (Yes, the ad says "primarily," but Frederick, MD is located in the Washington D.C. area, so I knew from experience the ad would likely pull lots of responses from local people.)​

The trouble here is that I discovered this information far too late. I had invested myself in the reading of the ad. I started to get excited. I started to imagine myself working for such a company, doing valuable work that mattered.​

And then, after all of that, I found out that they were looking for someone within driving distance. And that someone was not me.​

It was a real letdown.​

And this is not the first time I've had that experience. Not by a long shot.​

The moral of the story is: To keep your readers from experiencing the same, provide important information that helps them self-qualify early in the game.​


Join my tribe?

Do you sweat the small stuff? Do you want your online presence to inspire trust and confidence? Do you grit your teeth when others don't care enough about YOUR web experience? Are you all about creating an excellent website and excellent content that makes it easy for people to get to know, like, and trust you and buy your stuff?

I think we might be soul mates. And I'd love for you to join my tribe.

When you do, I'll alert you to new blog posts, new programs and products, and new ways for you to create excellent, frictionless, online experiences that lead more people to YES! I promise to be relevant and real, and to send only thoughtful content and advice.


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About the Author

Renae Gregoire is a marketing writer, editor, critical thinker, obsessive questioner, and excellent-results deliverer. Although writing is her talent, empathy is her Super Power; she combines both into a potent formula for creating content experiences that lead more people to YES!

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