How to differentiate using your logo

By Renae Gregoire | Differentiation

Jan 17
Does your logo set you apart?

My goal is the same as yours: Differentiate! 

You've heard it said that one of the chief goals of marketing is differentiation: Showing, telling, and illustrating to prospective customers why your product, service, or solution is better, faster, stronger, the right choice.

I faced the differentiation dilemma when developing a logo for my freelance writing business; perhaps something in my experience will give you an idea that helps you differentiate yours.​

My story: Trying to stand out from the crowd

In thinking about my logo, I had to figure out how what I offer differs from what every other marketing copywriter offers. When it came right down to it, I decided that what sets me apart is my writing--my writing philosophy and my writing style.

"But how so?" I wondered.​

HOW was I different? In what specific ways was I different? And how could I clearly communicate those differences to you, my potential client? I wanted my logo to stand out from the crowd, as I believe my writing does. I knew I'd never be able to do that using a pen, pencil, or light bulb. Take a look around; almost every writer uses those images.​

Which is precisely why I refused to do so.​

Sci-fi -- my inspiration​

I'm also a science fiction lover. Not the fantasy stuff, but hard, realistic sci-fi by authors like Asimov and Bova. Well, around the time when I was pondering what to do with my logo, I happened to be reading a sci-fi novel and came across a scene in which one of the characters discussed the workings of a laser. And how laser light differs from a light bulb's light.

Laser light is coherent light, I read. It's orderly. In laser light, all the photons move in synchronicity—like soldiers on a march. Laser light is also monochromatic, meaning that all the light is one wavelength, one color. It's directional, too, and can be focused precisely in a tight, strong, and concentrated beam.​

Light from a light bulb is different. When you turn on a light, light from the bulb is released willy-nilly in various directions. It scatters. It's diffuse. It's weak. And its energy is released randomly instead of coherently.​

And then ... pardon the cliche, apropos though it be ... a light bulb went off! I understood the difference--and my differentiation.​

Do you need light-bulb-type writing? Or laser-type writing? Each serves a purpose.​

First, light bulbs are ubiquitous. Everyone uses them. I must have at least two dozen of them throughout my house, and a supply of extras in the garage.

Second, all writers are … check that … I mean ... any person who can write a sentence is ... capable of sending out light (your message) the way a light bulb does: In a weak, diffuse, non-cohesive way.​

That doesn't mean it's bad light. Or even a bad message. After all, how would we see if we didn't have light bulbs?​

Similarly, light-bulb writing is good for general purposes. You can use it to write to your Aunt El in New Jersey. Or to your grandma in Michigan. And even to jot down little handwritten notes to your customers. But because light bulbs are common, because everyone uses them, anyone with a pen, pencil, or keyboard can compose a light-bulb-type message.​

Pull out the big guns, the laser, for special purposes--like when writing your marketing content.​

A laser, on the other hand, is a specialized piece of equipment used for specialized purposes. And not everyone knows how they work, or how to use them. How many people in your circle of friends keep a supply of extra lasers tucked away in their garages?

And even if you did happen to have a laser lying around, you wouldn't whip it out for any old lighting project. You'd have to be doing something pretty special to want to pull out the big gun—the laser.

Your marketing content is pretty special, wouldn't you say?​

It also takes special skills and knowledge to send out light (your message) the way a laser does: In a tight, organized, precision-targeted way. And you'd only whip out the laser when you really needed to focus sharply on something, such as in your marketing content.​

After all, there's no need for laser-like writing when you're composing a letter to grandma. But when you're trying to sell your products or services? You better believe it!​

Laser-like writing zeros in on exactly what your target audience wants and needs from your product and service. It tightly focuses (directs) the message in such a way that it positions your product or service as the solution or satisfaction.​

There you have it. That's where the laser beam in my logo comes from.​

And that's why my marketing writing service from the services of other writers out there. My writing is strong and clear instead of weak and unorganized. It's targeted instead of diffused. And it's not meant for writing letters to grandma. Its purpose is to help you meet your marketing and communication objectives--to lead more prospects to YES!

Want precision-targeted copy for your marketing content? Click here now for a complimentary consultation and quote.​

Images courtesy of: Lightbulb from Mconnors at Morguefile.com, Laser from Beamq at Morguefile.com​

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About the Author

Renae Gregoire is a marketing writer, editor, critical thinker, obsessive questioner, and excellent-results deliverer. Although writing is her talent, empathy is her Super Power; she combines both into a potent formula for creating content experiences that lead more people to YES!

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